Radon Information and Resources

What is Radon?

Radon is a cancer-causing, radioactive gas.  You can’t see Radon.  And you can’t smell it or taste it.  But it may be a problem in your home.  Radon is estimated to cause many thousands of deaths each year.  That’s because when you breathe air containing Radon, you can get lung cancer.  In fact, the Surgeon General has warned that Radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer in the United States today.  Only smoking causes more lung cancer deaths.  If you smoke and your home has high Radon levels, your risk of lung cancer is especially high.

Exposure to Radon Causes Lung Cancer In Non-smokers and Smokers Alike

Radon is the number one cause of lung cancer among non-smokers, according to EPA estimates.  Overall, Radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer.  Radon is responsible for about 21,000 lung cancer deaths every year.  About 2,900 of these deaths occur among people who have never smoked.  On January 13, 2005, Dr. Richard H. Carmona, the U.S. Surgeon General, issued a national health advisory on Radon.

 

 

How Does Radon Get Into Your Home?

Radon is a radioactive gas.  It comes from the natural decay of uranium that is found in nearly all soils.  It typically moves up through the ground to the air above and into your home through cracks and other holes in the foundation.  Your home traps Radon inside, where it can build up.  Any home may have a Radon problem.  This means new and old homes, well-sealed and drafty homes, and homes with or without basements. 

Radon from soil gas is the main cause of Radon problems.  Sometimes Radon enters the home through well water.  In a small number of homes, the building materials can give off Radon, too.  However, building materials rarely cause Radon problems by themselves. 

Nearly 1 out of every 15 homes in the U.S. is estimated to have elevated Radon levels.  Elevated levels of Radon gas have been found in homes in your state.  Testing is the only way to know if your home is safe. 

Radon is estimated to cause about 21,000 lung cancer deaths per year, according to EPA's Assessment of Risks from Radon in Homes (EPA 402-R-03-003)

The numbers of deaths from other causes are taken from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's 1999-2001 National Center for Injury Prevention and Control Report and 2002 National Safety Council Reports.

Your Radon Risk

If You Smoke...

Radon Level - If 1,000 people who smoked were exposed to this level over a lifetime*...The risk of cancer from radon exposure compares to**...What To Do: Stop smoking and...

20 pCi/L - About 260 people could get lung cancer.  250 times the risk of drowning.  Fix your home

10 pCi/L - About 150 people could get lung cancer.  200 times the risk of dying in a home fire.  Fix your home

8 pCi/L - About 120 people could get lung cancer.  30 times the risk of dying in a fall.  Fix your home

4 pCi/L - About 62 people could get lung cancer.  5 times the risk of dying in a car crash.  Fix your home

2 pCi/L - About 32 people could get lung cancer.  6 times the risk of dying from poison.  Consider fixing between 2 and 4 pCi/L

1.3 pCi/L - About 20 people could get lung cancer (Average indoor radon level)

0.4 pCi/L - About 3 people could get lung cancer (Average outdoor radon level)

Note: If you are a former smoker, your risk may be lower.
* Lifetime risk of lung cancer deaths from EPA Assessment of Risks from Radon in Homes (EPA 402-R-03-003).
** Comparison data calculated using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's 1999-2001 National Center for Injury Prevention and Control Reports.

If You've Never Smoked...

Radon Level - If 1,000 people who never smoked were exposed to this level over a lifetime*...The risk of cancer from radon exposure compares to**...What To Do:

20 pCi/L - About 36 people could get lung cancer.  35 times the risk of drowning.  Fix your home

10 pCi/L - About 18 people could get lung cancer.  20 times the risk of dying in a home fire.  Fix your home

8 pCi/L - About 15 people could get lung cancer.  4 times the risk of dying in a fall.  Fix your home

4 pCi/L - About 7 people could get lung cancer.  The risk of dying in a car crash.  Fix your home

2 pCi/L - About 4 person could get lung cancer.  The risk of dying from poison.  Consider fixing between 2 and 4 pCi/L

1.3 pCi/L - About 2 people could get lung cancer (Average indoor radon level)
0.4 pCi/L (Average outdoor radon level)

Note: If you are a former smoker, your risk may be higher.
* Lifetime risk of lung cancer deaths from EPA Assessment of Risks from Radon in Homes (EPA 402-R-03-003).
** Comparison data calculated using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's 1999-2001 National Center for Injury Prevention and Control Reports.

 

Radon Facts

Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive gas that comes from the breakdown of uranium which is found in the soil and rock throughout the United States.

Radon decays into radioactive particles that can become trapped in your lungs when you breathe. As these particles decay, they release small bursts of radiation that can damage lung tissue which can potentially lead to lung cancer. The U.S. Surgeon General has warned that Radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer in the country. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Colorado Department of Health have established a minimum recommended action level for mitigation of 4.0 picocuries of Radon gas elements per liter of air in a residence, commercial building or school.

  • Radon is an odorless, colorless and tasteless gas. The only way to know if your home has elevated Radon levels is to TEST.

  • Radon travels through the soil and enters buildings through openings and foundation. Radon enters your home from the soil because it is being drawn by the negative pressures or vacuums within your home.

  • The vacuum in your home is caused either by mechanical systems or by a thermal stack effect.

  • All types and age of homes can have elevated Radon levels.

  • Homes with basements, crawl spaces, slab on grade or any combination can all have elevated Radon levels.

  • A new home can have a Radon problem as well as an older home.

  • Your neighbor’s Radon levels do not necessarily represent your home’s Radon levels. Different factors contribute to the Radon levels in a home.

  • The amount of Radon in the soil beneath the home, interior negative pressures and the openings in the home’s foundation are all contributing factors.

  • The EPA recommendation is to reduce Radon levels in your home to below 4.0 picocuries per liter of air (pCi/L).

  • Approximately 50% percent of the homes in New York have Radon levels at or above the EPA’s action level of 4.0.  Most homes can have their Radon levels reduced for about the same cost of other common home repairs.

For more information concerning radon contact www.epa.gov/radon

It's never too late to reduce your risk of lung cancer.
Don't wait to test and fix a Radon problem.

Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive gas that can cause lung cancer.  You can’t see or smell Radon.  Testing is the only way to know your level of exposure.

Contact us to schedule a quote for Radon Testing or Mitigation today!  Call 716-725-8832

radon_deaths.jpg

SITE NEARLY READY

0%

100%

© 2023 by Under Construction. Proudly created with Wix.com